THE EGG-FREE, MILK-FREE, WHEAT-FREE COOKBOOK by

THE EGG-FREE, MILK-FREE, WHEAT-FREE COOKBOOK

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

According to allergist Wiesenfeld, hypersensitivity to eggs, milk, and wheat (no doubt he means eggs, milk or wheat) accounts for about 90 percent of food allergies seen by specialists; and most cases are children! Without these basic foods, what's a mother to do? Hamrick, the mother of one of Dr. Wiesenfeld's patients, offers her solutions--but they won't be everyone's. The recipes, which rely heavily on canned and packaged ingredients and include lots of Jell-o salads, might as well be culled from supermarket magazines of the Fifties; and anyone who wants such fare as frankfurter-tomato shortcake, cocktail weiners in a mustard-jelly sauce, or sliced baked ham rebaked with marshmallows and canned chunk pineapple, would probably look elsewhere than in a health-oriented cookbook. (Yes, you can also find here some plainer, less revolting entries--such as vegetable soup and an ordinary meatloaf--but you can also rind them easily in any basic cookbook.) And if the recipes also had to be sugar-free, Hamrick wouldn't have a book: breakfast entries are heavily sweetened, and almost half the book is devoted to desserts and snacks. Hamrick and Wiesenfeld offer no nutritional information, not even to point out that soy milk has ""nutritional value comparable to milk"" only when fortified with calcium and vitamins. Nor, by way of cooking advice, is there any warning that the soy flour-potato starch combination suggested as a wheat flour replacement won't make risen bread. Their chief contribution seems to be the substitution of non-dairy creamer in such dishes as cream-of-mushroom soup, creamed chicken, and mayonnaise.

Pub Date: Aug. 18th, 1982
Publisher: Harper & Row