ESSAYS, SPEECHES AND PUBLIC LETTERS OF WILLIAM FAULKNER by James B.- Ed. Merriweather

ESSAYS, SPEECHES AND PUBLIC LETTERS OF WILLIAM FAULKNER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Faulkner was seriously misquoted and felt he was willfully misinterpreted during his lifetime in regard to his views of the racial problem and among these essays, speeches and letters, this handy single source shows him constantly redefining his uncomfortable, because unpopular, position on a subject where he is still being misquoted. The essay section also includes articles on Mississippi, impressions of New England and Japan which are important to students of Faulkner in revealing his sensitivity to place and its primary role in his fiction. His published reviews show a direct, if subjective, approach to stating his opinions and tastes. He was a notable writer of letters to editors and these go from deeply committed statements on local or universal affairs to quizzical responses to the letters of others. He must have been a fine speaker because these show that he was mercifully brief and generally had a point to make. Mr. Merriweather rejects the idea that Faulkner ever hacked any work for publication and accepted only the assignments that interested him. It would seem so and this is an important addition to his paper trail.

Pub Date: Jan. 7th, 1965
Publisher: Random House