THOSE PERPLEXING ARGENTINES by James Bruce

THOSE PERPLEXING ARGENTINES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Only an Argentine could fail to have anything but an anti-Argentine opinion after reading this book- for in spite of the calmly factual and often humorous report by our former ambassador to that country (Mr. Bruce was there from 1947-1949) we are left with little doubt that these neighbors to the south are a conceited, narrow minded people with few of the political, social or economic graces that could lead to international understanding. In a popularized, if often repetitious, style Mr. Bruce covers phase of Argentine life from the cocktail hour to the slaughter house- political as well as animal. In short chapters that deal with different cities, modes of life, social classes, amusement, the family, the governmental spoils system, the rise of Peron and Evita, and the Jockey Club, he conducts a lively tour around the country telling us of such things as the manner of conduct for extra marital affairs, educational censorship, communist influence in the government controlled labor unions, or Peron's ambitions towards annexing other nations. More for the curious layman than the student, this does have its rewarding analyses. But it will find its strongest sales in the stalls along with Fleur Cowles' popular history, Bloody Pr (Random House 1952) of a country whose immediate future sees no turn to a healthy liberalism.

Pub Date: Sept. 23rd, 1953
Publisher: Longmans, Green