THE AFRICAN REVOLUTION by James Cameron

THE AFRICAN REVOLUTION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book is a comprehensive survey of the current political and economic situation on the entire continent of Africa. Within the limitations of what such a vast undertaking implies it is a competent and clear presentation. The author, a British journalist, begins by providing some background on the kind of history Africa has had, the size and distribution of its population, and its material resources. He then examines each country separately, devoting the most space to the Union of South Africa and the Congo. He attempts to define the various differences in African nationalism and he makes the point that there is no single constant in Africa, that ""the issues which face the French in Algeria have little in common with those that faced the Belgians in the Congo or the British in Kenya"". The book is primarily descriptive, not analytical but the author does draw some final conclusions -- which would be apparent to political students. For example he points out the absurdity of expecting these new nations to establish themselves within a parliamentary system dependent upon a permanent opposition. He notes that, at present, what African unity there is, is maintained by compromise and a hatred of European colonialism, and that, among the under-developed nations, it is China that is seen as the symbol of progress.

Pub Date: July 14th, 1961
Publisher: Random House