THE HUMAN SKELETON by

THE HUMAN SKELETON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

According to the jacket, Dr. Schuman is presenting the schematic system he devised in medical school to understand the framework of the human skeleton. The simple, rough line drawings by a professional medical illustrator preserve the spirit of the quick notebook sketch, but like high fashion, the apparent simplicity is not so simple, and requires a sophistication and understanding of skeletal form and function few young readers would initially possess (e.g., the double representation in wood and clay of the pelvis). The text is brief, but full of technical nomenclature. An index is included, but not a glossary. In comparison with Winders of the Human Body by Ravielli, Schuman presents far more mechanical detail, but is far less comprehensible both in text and illustrations. Ravielli has the added advantage of including the muscles and nervous systems, thus explaining how the frame hangs together and moves as it can. Nevertheless, this is an interesting conception and should have some value for biology teachers offering, as it does, devices for the presentation of information.

Pub Date: Sept. 7th, 1965
Publisher: Atheneum