FIGHTING SHIRLEY CHISHOLM by James Haskins

FIGHTING SHIRLEY CHISHOLM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The young Shirley--bright, scrappy and, yes, bossy--is recognizable here point by point as the child we met in Susan Brownmiller's 1970 biography, attending the strict British schools of Barbados, coming home to be a ""latch-key child"" in Brooklyn, developing an early interest in Harriet Tubman and Susan B. Anthony. Haskins fills us in on recent developments--Representative Chisholm's tendency to see herself as a spokesman and advocate rather than a lawmaker, second term compromises that won her a seat on the Education and Labor Committee and, of course, her maverick presidential campaign where being both black and a woman turned out to be a major source of conflict and, ironically, she won praise from George Wallace for being honest enough to tell it the same way in the South and the North. Though the bulk of Haskins' chapters merely redraw Brownmiller's sharp and vigorous character portrait, his thoughtful commentary on Chisholm's mature career is a significant addition.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1975
Publisher: Dial