WHO ARE THE HANDICAPPED? by James Haskins

WHO ARE THE HANDICAPPED?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

By explaining the causes, consequences, and nature of different kinds of disabilities and making a plea for understanding and acceptance, Haskins hopes to put a dent in the wall of prejudice he sees holding back all those ""whose only social offense is a physical or mental difference over which they have no control."" Unfortunately, many of his well-intentioned statements--""The person with a serious disability is every bit as good, as beautiful, as human as the normal person""; it is ""what he has to give"" that is important--are merely pious or poorly thought out; and he declares too casually that we should take time to listen to the deaf, that the blind have ""unique talents,"" or that we must ""assimilate them [the disabled in general] into the social mainstream as full participants."" Nevertheless, the little information he gives on each disorder might help to correct some misconceptions, and the specific measures he cites, such as the special Olympics, the successful employment of the retarded, and the legal drive for a barrier-free environment, speak for the cause.

Pub Date: June 9th, 1978
Publisher: Doubleday