SUNDAY'S CHILDREN by James Knox

SUNDAY'S CHILDREN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Framed by the funeral of the author's father, these are placid parsonage memories, preceding and during World War I. How they came from Arkansas to the pastorate in the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia, how they were welcomed by the new congregation, how they got their horse, Charlie Knox, -- this is part of the background for incidents of rectory life and the setting for mother, who put stars in the eyes of John, Ginny, Eva and James. Father's attempts to reform a drunk, to try to bring harmony with the other churches by Joint services, and to stop gambling at the county fair are complemented by the account of his arduous Sundays, his troubles with the choir and his problems during a revival. Mother's contributions are deft, even with the choir, John's efforts to get in the war and father's decision to become a chaplain. A loving, innocent recall of Methodist family life renders all due to the brave smiles and happy times of the past.

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin