THE TROUBLE WITH BEING IN LOVE by James L. Summers

THE TROUBLE WITH BEING IN LOVE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A highly controversial, prize-winning writer of teen-age love stories (Girl Trouble, 1953, p.122, Heartbreak Hot Rod, 1958, p.383, J-121, and several others), has painted a portrait of ""one tall creep with a sad haircut, alone in a sea of grass"". Thus, the author describes Milton Leon Powell, as the boy sees himself, mowing the grass, and ""bumping into"" images of his beloved Esther Sherwood, a lass with ""hair light and glossy as a good healthy dog's"". For at least the second time (Girl Trouble has the same view point), the author has written about the agonies of puppy love from the troubled male's stand. In probing the depths of poor Milton's mind, he has virtually desexed the lad, making him into a prissy, light-footed lamb. On the other hand, Milton is a good boy, a romantic idealist fit for a Round Table. (Authors writing for adults hardly realize that there are such among us). Our guess, though, is that Milton is going to be considered quite square by the young men who may find themselves with what is so patently a girls' love story in trousers.

Pub Date: April 22nd, 1963
Publisher: Westminster