THE UNITED STATES IN THE POSTWAR WORLD by James P. Warburg

THE UNITED STATES IN THE POSTWAR WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Warburg's thirteenth and most significant book restates his findings over the years on U.S. foreign policy and assesses the present with constructive suggestions of positive action, designed for the intelligent citizen. ""What we have done, what we have left undone, and what we can and must do""--so reads the subtitle. Tightly reasoned, objective and at the same time sharply critical, this is a useful and a provocative book. It will come to many as a shock to realize the cumulative effect of our frequent bypassing of the UN for unilateral action. Our smug conviction of our generosity, our tried and true democracy will suffer and demand reexamination. In Europe, our signal failure to solve the German question is somewhat offset by our part in bringing most of Europe to new life. In Africa, we fail to recognize the impracticability of imposing democracy, U.S. brand--but their need is so great that we have their seeming support of our otherwise completely unacceptable China policy. In Asia only Thailand backs us on the Vietnam undeclared war. And Warburg offers a constructive way out--summarizing in Appendix A the findings of the conference on Vietnam to which he was a delegate. Guatemala, the Bay of Pigs, the Dominican affair have combined to weaken our position in Latin America, despite the new look during Kennedy's brief but vitally important reversal of our policies. Here is a book that helps assess the present against the background of the immediate past and view the future with more conviction that an informed citizenry can do something about it.

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1966
Publisher: Atheneum