WALKER, THE WITCH, AND THE STRIPED FLYING SAUCER by James Stevenson

WALKER, THE WITCH, AND THE STRIPED FLYING SAUCER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

If I told you about me and the flying saucer, Walker says to friend Jane, ""you probably wouldn't believe me."" She allows that maybe she would, launching him into a tale of a witch pursuing a flying saucer . . . which Walker spots in the field, bearing an old-fashioned house, a roadster and a biplane . . . which the ""man"" on the front porch invites Walker to try. In each case, the GO button takes him for a spin through the sky. Landing, he finds the flying saucer gone--disembodied by the witch's magic broom and magic word, ""ELBISIVNI."" Indignant, Walker gives her a dose of her own medicine, then wanders home, reassured that it wasn't a dream by finding a cigar (the spaceman's cigar!) and hearing his parting words. Jane believes ""most of it"" but then ""some parts were truer than others"" (Walker says)--namely her laconic skepticism, his nonchalant handling of the whole improvisation.

Pub Date: Aug. 21st, 1969
Publisher: Little, Brown