JOSEPH PULITZER AND HIS WORLD by James Wyman Harrett

JOSEPH PULITZER AND HIS WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A life sized portrait of Joseph Pulitzer, that giant of journalism who gave The World ""its most distinctive impulse"", who stood for courage and liberalism and above all honesty, as spitomized by his classic phrase, -- ""Accuracy is to a paper what virtue is to a woman"". Of humble Hungarian parentage, homely and gauche, his quick-silver temperament was to make him rise meteorically from nobody to editorship of the Post-Dispatch, then of The World. Under his force, The World soon dominated all papers of his time, standing for progressive political reform. Prone to nervous attacks from abuse of his physical energy, blind at 45, he carried on nevertheless from far and near to direct his paper. His classic fights with ans of the Sun, with T.R., with his brother Albert. The founding of the Pulitzer Awards. His death. The World carried on after his death, until its eclipse. Written by the last City Editor, good journalism about a great journalist, liveware, enthusiastic, fast and perhaps a trifle overly full. The World has a still extent throng of admirers -- an sura of worship has hovered around its name. To these -- and to newspaper people everywhere, this book will mean much.

Pub Date: Sept. 25th, 1941
Publisher: Vanguard