THE LONG MARCH by Jane Barry

THE LONG MARCH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The story of an ""aging lion...scarred by old battles"" centers on Daniel Morgan, licking his wounds and recovering his health in Virginia, and Abby, his wife, and the girl known as Mary Craig, an agent for the patriot troops. Mary brings him word of the armies in the field, and, with the defeat at Camden, the Old Wagoner, in spite of health and martial feuds, leaves for his original ""Riflers"" and the Southern Army. From Frances Marion to Greene, young Will Washington and the gathering of forces, Daniel rallies the men, pulls them with him as they retreat in order to draw Cornwallis and Tarleton in from the coast and far from supplies. Always seeking a proper spot for battle, always fighting the pain, Morgan, after Mary Craig has been captured by Tarleton, makes his stand at Hannah's Cow, pens -- and is the means of cracking the British. Mary's devotion takes her back to Abby and Morgan's collapse returns him home too -- and dreams of a new home, with Abby's care and improved health. A big man in buckskin against a spirited background of revolutionary times of 1779-1781 is captured in a competent fictionizing -- for an audience that thrills to bugle calls.

Pub Date: Oct. 21st, 1955
Publisher: Appleton-Century-Crofts