LIVING TOGETHER IN NATURE: How Symbiosis Works by Jane E. Hartman

LIVING TOGETHER IN NATURE: How Symbiosis Works

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Among the books on symbiosis, this is the youngest in appearance and orientation--a few sentences characterize each relationship--and disappointing in its organization, or lack of it. Hartman is using the broadest definition, for she indudes not just mutually beneficial arrangements (tickbird and rhino, moray eel and cleaner shrimp) but also those which help just one partner (bird nesting in an aardvark burrow) and those parasitical associations which can be harmful (mistletoe on trees). In addition, the symbiotic relationships (usually one to a page) are introduced in no apparent order, so that those exemplifying reciprocity are mixed in higgledy-piggledy with those demonstrating one-sided advantage. And the serial description of more than twenty pairs, without cross-references or stated contrasts, is too demanding for the age group intended.

Pub Date: Oct. 15th, 1977
Publisher: Holiday House