THE DANCER FROM THE DANCE by Janet Burroway

THE DANCER FROM THE DANCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Without any of the incisive ideas masked behind Eyes (1966--her second novel, which appeared here first), this is calibrated toward a feminine readership and is a composed, quite civilized romance with an attractive montage. The story is told by Stanford Powers, who has devoted his life to ""that humdrum compromise of soul, the State"" and who is now stationed with UNICEF in Paris. At the request of his son-in-law, and later in the interests of his nephew, a medical student, he secures a job and a place to live for Prytania Scott Okee, stranded there, eighteen, not only displaced but also disconcerting. She's an Oriental American octoroon who succeeds in subverting all their lives: not only nephew kenneth's, but the marriage of a dancer-mime, and finally Stanford Powers, whose disinterested negotiations in all this become more suspect.... Miss Burraway, an agreeable writer, tells her story in a sufficiently circumspect fashion to retain her readers' interest while occasionally jostling them in an unexpected fashion. Her virtues are unassertive ones--taste and tact.

Pub Date: Jan. 15th, 1967
Publisher: Little, Brown