THE STARS HANG HIGH by Janet Lambert

THE STARS HANG HIGH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Another panel in the Jordon family saga- and reading about Suzie and Bitsy again, and coming up to date with poor, unstable Gwenn's tragedy makes one feel as though her stories on the level of the lower teens, against a background of army life; and at her worst when she attempts the somewhat dazzling atmosphere of the domestic circus afforded by this latest effort. Suzy keeps house for her army father, carries on a job, and keeps a horde of admirers in a turmoil (and of course is engaged before the story ends). Bitsy, her European years behind her, finds settling down at fifteen in an unfamiliar atmosphere very disturbing. But her admiration for Suzie, her fear of inheriting Gwenn's mental insecurity, keep her at fever pitch in the uncertain years of adolescence, and growing up is a painful process. Their problems find ultimate, somewhat pat, solutions, Bitsy -- approaching maturity- reaches up for a moment to touch the stars, and the groundwork is laid for yet another sequel. This belongs in the league with Love Taps Gently, Friday's Child, A Dream for Susan-romantic tripe, but the fans eat it up.

Pub Date: March 30th, 1960
Publisher: Dutton