THE STORY OF SCOTLAND by Janet R. Glover

THE STORY OF SCOTLAND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This survey of Scottish history deals with events chronologically up to the founding of the United Kingdom by the Treaty of Union of 1707. It then provides a brief account of developments during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries under subject headings such as ""Agriculture"" and ""Parliament and Politics,"" ending with a section of ""Scotland Since 1870"" that includes some happenings up to 1957. Because of the scope of the work, there is room for little more than a recital of names and dates during some eventful eras, but the author is obviously steeped in her subject and is at great pains to make it comprehensible to the outsider. If the reader can keep his wits about him and disentangle the various Malcolms, Davids, and Alexanders that ruled from the eleventh to thirteenth centuries, he will emerge with not only a general picture of the history of Scotland, but also with some ideas as to why Scotland only began to prosper with the coming of the Industrial Revolution. According to the author, one main reason for this is the unusual number of infant monarchs, which effectively left the government in the hands of regents and thereby inhibited the growth of nationalism. In the final passages, after assuming that the tenets of British Socialism are universally held, she briefly questions their effect on personal initiative and responsibility. Good for reference or general background.

Pub Date: Sept. 6th, 1960
Publisher: Roy