THE G.I. JOURNAL OF SERGEANT GILES by Janice Holt- Ed. Giles

THE G.I. JOURNAL OF SERGEANT GILES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The journal of Weapons Sergeant Henry Giles of the 291st Combat Engineers goes from just prior to D-Day and ends with the victory in Europe. His unit was in the Normandy invasion, engaged in the Battle of the Bulge and took part in the building of the famous Bridge at Remagen. While these man-in-action accounts are important for the viewpoint, it is the pen portraits of his comrades and the record of daily G.I. existence that will be of value to future historians. Some saw only mud and wrote about it, but Sgt. Giles could usually find the stars and he emerges as temperate idealist. The journal has been expanded with passages from the letters he wrote his wife, who edited this book. At the moment, the reading audience for WWII books is a fairly confined one seemingly satisfied with overview histories and biographies of major military and political figures. The first person records, so popular during the war years, are awaiting rediscovery. Expect delayed action.

Pub Date: March 23rd, 1965
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin