JANICE LAROUCHE'S STRATEGIES FOR WOMEN AT WORK by Janice & Regina Ryan LaRouche
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JANICE LAROUCHE'S STRATEGIES FOR WOMEN AT WORK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A spiffy manual-of-arms for feminists who are also careerists. ""Achieving independence and equality is not easy,"" notes the founder of Workshops for Women, advisedly. But the book can make getting there much lighter work. Big chapters have small, punchy subsections--listed at the start. Blocks to Success tackles The Morality Block and The Helpmate Block, along with 21 others. Moving Up addresses such common quandaries as My Boss Doesn't Promote Secretaries and How Can I Get a Raise? (LaRouche herself got a job as secretary ""to someone whose title I was aiming for."") Building the Right Image starts with stereotypes: If You Are Seen as Having Nothing Important to Say--""Don't talk until you have something important to say,"" ""Stage your contributions,"" ""Don't take too many words to tell your story."" (If You Are Seen As Good for Only One Thing,"" here's how to parry come-ons with humor and cool.) On the job, ""don't sign a blank check of endless cooperation""--as Samantha's boss was all-too-obviously hoping; instead, raise the issue of what you were hired to do. I'm Having Trouble Being the Boss gets into management hard-ball: how Fran clipped her overweening assistant's wings, how Erika got rid of her ""barracuda"" deputy. ""Discomfort or fear stops many women from establishing relationships in business."" ""We should not longer retreat and leave the field to the bad guys."" The issue of femininity is faced too--and there are stratagems for self-protection (Don't Tell All) and self-enhancement (Tell Jokes). Two ingenious content-guides provide maximum access. Thus, under Asserting Yourself, you'll find My Boss Is Always Criticizing Me (Chapter 2, #16), You Are Seen as Weak (Chapter 4, Part I, #5), and I Have Trouble Supervising People I Don't Like (Chapter 6, #6). LaRouche and Ryan precisely identify women's problems--and discuss them in terms women can identify with. In a league with Betty Lehan Harragan's Games Mother Never Taught You and Knowing the Score.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1984
Publisher: Avon