A quick, helpful and soulful read for same-sex couples looking to navigate the treacherous but rewarding surrogacy journey.

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The Journey of Same-Sex Surrogacy

DISCOVERING ULTIMATE JOY

A common-sense, spiritual primer for prospective same-sex parents.

Equal parts memoir and how-to manual, this approachable book demystifies the complex topic of surrogacy—one that’s particularly fraught with pitfalls for would-be same-sex parents. Throughout, Warner does an admirable job of guiding the reader through the various steps involved in the same-sex surrogacy journey, covering everything from lining up a surrogate to navigating the legal quagmire of second-parent adoption. Each state has its own, often idiosyncratic, laws and regulations, so the author strongly encourages the reader to speak with a lawyer who specializes in same-sex surrogacy before beginning the process. To that end, he includes a section, penned by attorney Richard Vaughn of the International Fertility Law Group, devoted to the various challenges faced by same-sex parents seeking surrogacy as a possibility. Warner’s spirituality informs much of the book; he and his partner, deMarco, met their surrogate, Mary, at the Unity church in Houston, Texas, where they helped run a youth program. This spirituality grounds the book; Warner credits it for the moments of serendipity that coalesced into the “Divine providence” of his surrogacy experience. Overall, he does an excellent job of guiding the reader through the process. However, the book might have benefited from a deeper examination of Warner and deMarco’s motivations for pursuing surrogacy in the first place, as opposed to adoption. Although the book explores their decision to trade their Jeep Wrangler for a Volkswagen Routan in depth, it doesn’t explain why it was important that each father fertilize an embryo, other than to say that only one would have been “just as important, but…different.”

A quick, helpful and soulful read for same-sex couples looking to navigate the treacherous but rewarding surrogacy journey.

Pub Date: Dec. 17, 2013

ISBN: 978-0615895628

Page Count: 138

Publisher: Zygote Publishing

Review Posted Online: Feb. 26, 2014

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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