THE YOUNG REVOLUTIONARIES: A History of Youthful Heroes in the American Revolution by J.C. Long

THE YOUNG REVOLUTIONARIES: A History of Youthful Heroes in the American Revolution

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Youthful rebellion, campus agitation. . . and it's meant to sound familiar: seems that ""it is natural for the younger element in every population from their late teens onward to be against the establishment, whatever form it may take"" -- ergo the American Revolution. Mr. Long avers that ""the establishment itself . . . was against British rule"" so the young had some help, which seems to cancel out the only pretext for this ill-reasoned, disorganized book. In twelve chapters are random and redundant observations on the nature and course of the Revolution and -- what is supposedly the focus of each -- some equally adventitious information about each of thirteen men and women who participated in some way when they were young. Some became famous later (e.g. Andrew Jackson, James Monroe), some are known for a particular feat (Nathan Hale, Betsy Ross), one was neither young nor a hero (Benedict Arnold, who gets the most attention); all are well known and need no further introduction. A final chapter surveys the wartime role of each of the then existent colleges.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1968
Publisher: John Day