WORKING MOTHERS by Jean Curtis

WORKING MOTHERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A sanguine and always reasonable look at the best of both possible worlds along with the live-in liabilities, this is based on the experiences of some 200 women. There are many variables, but the constants are the same: fatigue and overwork even with a cooperating husband (author Curtis rather scants the obdurate ones that don't). Otherwise she is firm in indicating how attitudes have changed--even in the last five years. She discusses when to go back to work (either when your child is an infant or in elementary school); attitudes (don't apologize or overcompensate); parental legacies (people with busy mothers have the easiest time adapting); child care (the au pair girl is generally preferred to day care centers which tend to be either ""groovy"" or custodial); housework (much less important than the quarrels you've been sweeping under the rug); the sexual stimulus (not necessarily gratification) which working with men occasions. Curtis provides more definite advice than most books of this kind (rebutting Lee Salk all the way) so you can yourself assess the pros, cons and inevitable mixed feelings about being a working mother.

Pub Date: Jan. 23rd, 1975
Publisher: Doubleday