PORTRAIT OF MANET BY HIMSELF AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES by

PORTRAIT OF MANET BY HIMSELF AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

From letters, memoirs, evaluations- current and latterday, this complete portrait of the impressionist innovator has been formed, and it is seen that this gentle, unpretentious painter was sponsored only by a few friends and followers at the time and was hyper-sensitive to the crushing criticism with which his work was received. Manet's letters to his wife, chiefly during the war of 1870, notations on his travels, his apprenticeship in the atelier of Couture, his last years and death, give minor personal details. More substantial and revealing are the comments of critics, collectors and his own claque (Zola, Mallarme, and the artists who followed him into plein air painting) as well as his own aesthetic credo- to fix ""the impression of a moment in time"". It was this ""revelation"" which became a ""revolution"" and while Manet was an uneven painter who would be surpassed by many to follow him, there is no question of his achievement so disputed at the time. The concluding material here contains sketches, evaluations by Zola, Baudelaire, Valery, and many others as well as miscellaneous articles and papers and a full bibliography... Not for the dilettante, but for the devotee, for students of this period and libraries with permanent collections in this field.

Pub Date: May 14th, 1962
Publisher: Roy