OUR LADY OF THE FLOWERS by Jean enet

OUR LADY OF THE FLOWERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

artre, whose Saint Genet will have just appeared here, introduces this novel here a meaningless designation) which Genet wrote in prison in 1942 and which will- for ome- have no more value than the graffiti scrawled on the walls of a cell. To Sartre, ur Lady has its importance as the work which would mark the progression of an aesthete an artist and which would thematically contrast a ""pitiless Providence"" with ""divine reedom""- Genet's. It is also, unmistakably, and overwhelmingly, an ""epic of masturation""; the onanistic, homoerotic reveries of the prisoner conjure up a cavalcade of ueens, pimps, and fags-- the fantasy figures of Divine, the whore, as she cruises hrough Montmartre; Darling Daintyfoot, the ""handsome male, gentle and violent, born be a pimp""; Our Lady of Flowers, the ""innocent murderer""; Gorgui, the Negro; etc., etc. and the scenes of the ""submission of flesh to flesh"" lead on to others of criminal odges and scatological phenomena. Through it, Genet, who was a pariah in the world ustside, becomes a God in the autistic world he creates here. And the wishful nostalgie la boue of the 19th century becomes the actuality of the 20th..... Whether it is lewed as consecrated erotica, or just as important in Genet's genesis, the big commercial question will be- does it have Miller's potency?

Pub Date: Oct. 7th, 1963
Publisher: Grove