SIDNEY HILLMAN by Jean Gould

SIDNEY HILLMAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Sympathetically and sentimentally, this biography portrays the life of one of American labor's champions. Born in Zagare on the Latvia-Lithuanian border, Sidney was a solemn, studious youth. He became a political refugee after the 1905 revolution, accomplished his plan of coming to America and found his first job as a cutter in Hart, Schaffner and Marx' Chicago factory. From then on his life was concerned with one union movement after another. As head of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers, he fought for the forty-four hour week, even production standards -- on down to the post World War II 75¢ minimum wage issue, becoming in the process a much discussed fugure. The facts of Hillman's basic sitruism, his love of the workers, his serious minded boyhood, and his Jewish background, have been sugered in the prose to the point of saturation, but the underlying sincerity and devotion make this a credible presentation.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1952
Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin