ROBERT FROST: THE AIM WAS SONG by Jean Gould

ROBERT FROST: THE AIM WAS SONG

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A labor love,"" the author says of this biography, written on a grant, and after a lifetime interest in Frost's poetry. It shows many of the faults and virtues of such a work. The opening sections, about Frost's boyhood, are awkward and ardent; but as Frost's later accomplishments begin to catch up to the author's admiration, the book acquires a more succinct and effective dignity; particularly since it is enhanced with quotations from Frost's poetry, life, and friendships. As written of here, Frost's life was a quietly splendid one. He did not write much, nor achieve fame, until he was nearly forty; his success afterward mounted steadily, forged from continuing joy in writing, country life, and some teaching. This sense of an unfolding of an inner life, as well as a factually-noted outer one, makes this, on the whole, a pleasing biography. If somewhat informal and amateur, it is nevertheless on informed and movingly affectionate portrait of a remarkable poet.

Pub Date: April 6th, 1964
Publisher: odd, Mead