WHATEVER YOU DO DON'T PANIC by Jean Mercier

WHATEVER YOU DO DON'T PANIC

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Another sneak attack on suburbia stems out of its heroine's, Stephanie Lamont's roots in urban life, which prevent her from adjusting to the joys of Catatonia. Everything there is a menace, from the house to the outdoors and its terrifying wild life; from the neighbors and acquaintances to the shops and daily living. But once around the negative post, adjustment sets in -- she learns to drive, she copes with servicemen and salespeople, and in finding a place, further from the city, is committed to a country existence. Here, again, are the woes of the commuters, the round of feminine activities, the seasonal happenings -- against a domestic background; and the author is able, at times, to compete with the other Jean (Kerr), McGinley and Halsey -- but at others -- she is outclassed. However mirrors for suburbiana are popular.

Pub Date: March 3rd, 1961
Publisher: Doubleday