THE THISTLE AND THE ROSE by Jean Plaidy

THE THISTLE AND THE ROSE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Another Tudor prom queen sees it through in still another reissue (the book appeared in England only) dealing with Margaret, sister of Henry VIII, future Queen of Scotland, who arrives to wed James IV and who looks like all Plaidy Tudorines -- feisty and dewy with clouds of lustrous hair. But the roses fade when she learns of her husband's infidelities and by-blows. She does cope, queen-wise, until James is killed at Flodden Field but then must ward off power plays aimed at securing control of James V, her young son. This would normally be pheasant soup for a Tudor but Margaret is passion's slave. Thus the unwise marriages to first, the shifty Duke of Argus, later to charming Harry. Alas even Harry has a love out-of-court, and Margaret dies wondering if she could ever have been wanted for herself alone. Plaidy makes it all dimly plausible for ladies who revel in royal pasts.

Pub Date: Aug. 8th, 1973
Publisher: Putnam