THE TRAVELLERS by Jean Stubbs

THE TRAVELLERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Although the whimsy and nostalgia periodically become thick enough to lice, Jean Stubbs has managed to create an interesting and alive cast of characters in her variation on the Grand Hotel theme. Crossroads of the world in this case is a ramshackle English apartment house, to which Ben and Mair Macintosh, two delightful young newly married art students come to live. Their roblem is growing up in the big bad world, and the watered down Mephistopheles of the house, a chaming hunchback named Charles Chantinall, does not aid matters by his dabblings into the lives of the inhabitants. Yet he does not affect atters very seriously either, and is polished off without much of a fuss. Ben and Mair part, come together again, and finally leave for the Never-Never Land of the future. The house and its characters remain a shade too lovable to be rue, and all can do no wrong from the patronizing distance at which they were viewed.

Publisher: St. Martin's Press