RX 2000 by Jeffrey A. Fisher

RX 2000

Breakthroughs in Health, Medicine, and Longevity for the Next Five to Forty Years

KIRKUS REVIEW

 Bold predictions, mostly glowing, about the technological advances to come in medicine, complete with a time line from now to 2030. Fisher, a clinical pathologist and syndicated columnist with a knack for making science accessible to the layperson, consulted an impressive array of scientific and medical experts before making his projections--all of which, he says, are based on research currently under way. He examines major trends in such areas as manipulation of the reproductive process, organ transplantation, psychopharmacology, and diagnostic self-tests, and identifies probable advances. Fisher also looks at specific ills, major and minor, and projects the progress in combating each. He's not afraid to get specific--e.g., ``By the year 2002, transplantation perfection will be reached.'' Indeed, the core of the text is a year-by-year chronicle, presented in headline format, of the changes to come--for 1997, ``Abortion Drug Approved in United States,'' and for 2030, ``Coronary Disease, Cancer Effectively Wiped Out'' and ``Maximum Human Life-Span Increased to 150 Years.'' The social implications of technological advances are not entirely overlooked, but neither are they delved into. Fisher's view is essentially a cheerful one, at least for the affluent members of industrialized societies, for they are the primary beneficiaries of the advances he foresees. (Evidently the have-nots will be selling their organs to the haves, or at least until cloning really takes off in 30 years.) Although Fisher sees the AIDS epidemic ending in 2003, he cautions that genetic therapy carries with it the risk of new plagues. But not to worry: that's the price of progress, and he assures us that science will conquer them as well. A superficial look at the brave new world to come, enlightening primarily about research trends.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1992
ISBN: 0-671-73844-5
Page count: 320pp
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15th, 1992