HOW TO TURN AN INTERVIEW INTO A JOB OFFER by Jeffrey Allen

HOW TO TURN AN INTERVIEW INTO A JOB OFFER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Power ploys in job interviewing from an insider. Allen, a ""placement attorney"" with experience in personnel counseling, recommends turning the tables on interviewers by calling them once they have your rÉsumÉ on the desk, then staying on the line just long enough to schedule a meeting. (""I am sorry, but I'm just about to leave for an appointment. I'd really like to meet. . . tomorrow morning at 8 o'clock?"") Job-hunters, he says, must develop a rhythm: two interviews a day, neither lasting more than two hours, so that you avoid tricky mealtime interviews and appear to have another commitment (""People always want what they can't have. . .""). Yes, the standard pointers are here, too: research the firm to appear knowledgeable; dress conservatively (navy blue, three-piece suits for men); be punctual; smile and give a firm handshake, etc. But, also: pray for the interrogation or ""stress"" interview, because once you have your answers down pat, it gives you a chance to shine over other applicants. Weaknesses? You're ""too concerned about doing a good job at work."" You get angry only with ""someone who intentionally does not do his job properly."" And so forth. Allen's chief weakness is a tendency to glorify executive head-hunters and other placement services. But he's sharp on techniques for handling--or manipulating--potential employers. Applicants with the proper, nervy attitude will probably find them useful.

Pub Date: April 29th, 1983
Publisher: Simon & Schuster