HOW TO HANDLE YOUR OWN LAWSUIT by Jerome S. Rice

HOW TO HANDLE YOUR OWN LAWSUIT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An amiable brief on civil procedure for the amateur advocate--how to get to court and what to do there. The rub, though, is that while trying a case is clearly easy for Rice the pro, it would be difficult for a novice, despite his avowals to the contrary; but certainly there are ethical and practical hazards, undisclosed here, when a lawyer's words are stuffed into a layman's mouth. Rice supplies the necessary forms to copy (including all the fancy talk: ""further your affiant sayeth naught,"" and ""hereof fail not on pain of the penalty that will fall thereon""). And calendar practice, pretrial discovery, jury selection, and post trial motions are all surveyed. There's even a creditable summary of exceptions to the hearsay rule. Plus: trial tactics and courtroom demeanor are sensibly treated. Altogether, the law is solid and the advice proper. (And you'll learn, along the way, what a competent trial attorney does for a living.) But not many people will have the know-how and the: confidence to take advantage of what's offered.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1979
Publisher: Contemporary