DWELL IN LOVE by Jerry K. Paul

DWELL IN LOVE

Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A spiritual seeker shares advice on communing with God.

After pursuing religious studies for many years without achieving a sense of satisfaction, Paul turns his search for God earthward and finds evidence of His spirit in fellow humankind. The author maintains that he was only able to discern the presence of God when he realized it was dwelling within others. He also discovered that focusing on his own inner spirit of pure light and love would allow him to effect change and healing in people. The author details the experiences of his spiritual journey in this weighty tome, sharing messages he claims to have received from God himself. Paul’s suggestions for prayer and meditation may help readers achieve the divine spirit in everything around them, particularly if believers remember that judgment and strife in the physical world are just manifestations of unpleasantness within themselves. The author is quick to point out the universality of his techniques: Paul has communed not only with the spirit of a death-row inmate who expressed remorse before his execution, but also the spirits of such luminaries as Mikhail Gorbachev and the Ayatollah Khomeini (who, the author claims, resolved to make peace in Iran after their telepathic retreat). The second part of the book shares the wisdom gained over a devotional period of seven months, during which time the author was instructed to become an “empty vessel” for God’s will. The remainder of the volume recounts Paul’s conversations with both God and Jesus about devoting himself to this exact purpose. Whether readers will accept the religious truth of Paul’s text, the book does offer a hopeful outlook on the world and guidance for those seeking spiritual growth. Dwell in Love’s contents are rather repetitive, so readers may wish to meditate upon one message at a time, as the author suggests, as opposed to consuming it in one sitting.

Effective meditations upon seeking peace and love both within and without.

Program: Kirkus Indie
Review Posted Online: