DEFENDER OF THE ANGELS by Jess Kimbrough

DEFENDER OF THE ANGELS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A Black Policeman in Old Los Angeles"" before World War I appears in this autobiography under the name of Strite Hinton who learned his lesson as a kid when a white man spat on his grandmother's carpetbag. Eligible via a written test for the police force, #264 goes over some twenty-odd years of service and after hours activities with Celia, ""a ass broad 'nough to ride you on to glory."" This is a very subdued indication of the way in which Mr. Hinton tells his story which could easily serve as an early style book for Chester Himes. It was of course the less enlightened era (closing comments on today's situation) when there was ""peckerwood law in every burg (which) goes for graft and payoffs."" There's some casework to be sure about Slim Jack, one of Celia's former associates temporarily hauled in; or a lone Negro bandit; or a Mexican dope peddler who shoots one of the force; or Lily a ""fast black"" and her pleasure crew; etc. Mr. Hinton became increasingly disaffected with his policeman's lot when Celia's house was listed on the weekly payoff list and his superior told him to get her out of town. . . . Even for one on the side of the angels, pretty indefensible in terms of taste.

Pub Date: May 12th, 1969
Publisher: Macmillan