THE MASSACRE AT FALL CREEK by Jessamyn West

THE MASSACRE AT FALL CREEK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is Jessamyn West's most cloquent book in some years with an authoritative sense of the time (1824) and the place (Indiana) as well as the actual episode on which this story is based (however sketchy the surviving records). It deals, very simply, with the killing of nine Indians -- men, women and children -- for which four men were tried while a ""long hunter,"" Jud Clasby, ""too tough for anything but true lead,"" who had wanted them ""cleared out,"" got away scot-free. This is the first time that one law for both whites and Indians was put into effect -- overlooking what the settlers had suffered at Indian hands, or the fact that they had been ""brought up to believe that killing an Indian served a better purpose than killing a deer."" Still the massacre was an indefensible act, either in the eyes of the law or God in the person of their minister Cale, who persuaded one of his converts to make a confession. And the law is upheld from the trial to the conviction to the hangings (all save the youngest) in spite of the attempt of lawyer Charles Fort whose failure parallels that of his love of Hannah, the preacher's daughter. Miss West's well-weathered sense of the period, as plain and sturdy as buckram, stiffens the fictional aspects of a story which has, of course, its modern intention. It also has the qualities Jessamyn West has retained through the years -- an open-faced sentiment and very available sympathy -- which assures a substantial readership at various levels.

Pub Date: April 3rd, 1975
ISBN: 0156576813
Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich