THE FOURTEENTH CADILLAC by Jesse Jackson

THE FOURTEENTH CADILLAC

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Less a finished novel than impressionistic sketches of Calvary -- or black Columbus, Ohio, in 1925, as experienced by teen-aged Stonewall Jackson who is first seen at the funeral of Aunt Hettie, his soul mate in The Sickest Don't Always Die the Quickest (1971). Jackson doesn't attempt to construct a plot out of Stonewall's problems in landing a suitable job (and avoiding one as the undertaker's apprentice) or appeasing his girl Talitha who resents his refusal to join the church. Instead, this is to be read -- by youngsters who don't require narrative tension, psychological depth or even polished writing -- for Stonewall's passing observations on Calvary funeral protocol and pretension (here it is Uncle Ernie's white, car-dealer boss who drives the fourteenth Cadillac to the burial) and the distinctly evoked social surfaces of this church-centered community where the altar is equipped -- are you ready? -- with a white telephone hooked up with heaven.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1972
Publisher: Doubleday