HOW IT FEELS TO FIGHT FOR YOUR LIFE by Jill Krementz

HOW IT FEELS TO FIGHT FOR YOUR LIFE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The fourth in Krementz's respected ""How It Feels"" series tackles coping with serious accidents and life-threatening or chronic illness. The 14 children here range from age 7 to 16; their first-person profiles document their efforts to prevail over cancer, epilepsy, diabetes, lupus, heart problems, spina bifida, cystic fibrosis, arthritis, asthma, kidney disease, facial burns, and paralysis resulting from gunshot wounds. The narrative is blunt, moving, and compelling as the youngsters talk about complicated, sometimes disappointing treatments, the pain of operations or chemotherapy, family stress, and such specific concerns as substituting one sport for another or being afraid that they won't wake up. Anton aptly sums it up: ""I think I'm doing pretty well. But when I blow out a candle, break a wishbone, or see a shooting star, I always wish that I didn't have asthma."" These appealingly photographed kids are truly inspirational. They exhibit great self-knowledge and are remarkable for their spirit--due in part to fine support systems that include exemplary pediatric hospital programs, parents who--defying statistics--stay married in spite of crisis, and friends who stick. These are models to give courage to patients, family, or friends.

Pub Date: Oct. 16th, 1989
Page count: 132pp
Publisher: Joy Street/Little, Brown