BREAKTHROUGH TO THE BIG LEAGUE by
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BREAKTHROUGH TO THE BIG LEAGUE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Frank autobiography is not the usual fare offered younger readers and this one looks to be the best thing in print for juveniles about Jackie Robinson. In this as-told-to, Jackie Robinson begs no questions on any of the issues that were raised when he helped breach the racial barriers against Negroes in big league baseball. He talks about his aspirations as a young athlete in terms of his personal, material goals as well as in terms of his convictions about Negro rights. This dual glimpse enhances his stature rather than detracts from it and shows him developing as a man rather than a symbol. He urges pride on his readers and determination, citing these as the qualities that kept him going during the difficult first years with the Dodgers. Branch Rickey had imposed total self-control on Robinson. He had wanted a man who wouldn't fight back in the face of petty insults and major slanders. Robinson names in this section -- which opposing players, coaches and teammates operated against him in prejudice. When Rickey saw that his record on the field and in public was irrefutable, he released him from the silence vow and Robinson describes in exciting detail how he fought back. He pulled no punches -- neither does the autobiography.

Pub Date: April 7th, 1965
Publisher: Harper & Row