Kirkus Reviews QR Code
I WANT TO THANK MY BRAIN FOR REMEMBERING ME by Jimmy Breslin

I WANT TO THANK MY BRAIN FOR REMEMBERING ME

A Memoir

By Jimmy Breslin

Pub Date: Sept. 19th, 1996
ISBN: 0-316-11031-0
Publisher: Little, Brown

 Prototypical ink-in-the-veins journalist Breslin (Damon Runyon, 1991; The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight, 1969; etc.) now reports on a matter that concentrated his mind wonderfully, a matter for which his experience never prepared him: the opening of his skull to release an aneurysm. The burly columnist has fully recovered from a ``right pterinonal craniotomy with unruptured anterior communication artery aneurysm.'' A blood vessel in his brain was set to burst, quicker than a thought, at any time it chose. If not death, the event could have, for Breslin, triggered something worse. He could have lost all vocabulary and the ability to communicate. Happily, all is well inside the newsman's head. The evidence is this street-smart report from the purgatory of patienthood. On the armature of the life- threatening aneurysm, Breslin fleshes out a distinctive, funny memoir in the tones and syntax of the courtrooms and saloons of Brooklyn and Queens. It's a sage and cagey stream-of-consciousness flowing at extraordinary velocity. Here are family members as well as the likes of Lenny Bruce, Casey Stengel, and Marvin the Torch (``I build empty lots,'' said Marvin). In extremis, the remembrances of things past--the unhappy childhood, the stalking by Son of Sam, the bookmakers, gangsters, and ward heelers, the penury and proud achievements and the wonderment of life and love, no less--are covered in kaleidoscopic flashbacks. If it's occasionally disorderly, prideful, and cocky, it's always distinctive and often affecting. And the explicit depiction of the surgery, performed to the strains of Schubert's ``Trout Quintet,'' is simply harrowing. The Bard of the Boroughs is back with his accustomed wit in a chiaroscuro text that is more felicitous than the awkward title would hint.