SUPERTRAINING YOUR DOG by Jo & Paul Loeb Loeb

SUPERTRAINING YOUR DOG

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Call it training or supertraining, it's the same old but effective command-correct-praise obedience training technique. Expanding on the basics in Paul Loeb Complete Book of Dog Training (1974), animal trainer Loeb and wife Jo (coauthor of You Can Train Your Cat, 1977) give comprehensive and detailed, if wordy, instructions for teaching a dog to do everything from ""sit"" and ""stay"" to jumping over hurdles and ""tracking"" one special (scented) toy out of a pile Directions are repeated, needlessly, for the same lessons learned indoors, off the leash, and outdoors. And ""roll over"" and ""play dead"" are taught as commands, not tricks--though Rover may disagree. For obstinate dogs there are special treatments to show who's boss--like the ""Rubber Arm Technique,"" where the trainer throws a noisy object near (or at) the recalcitrant pooch. Or, if your pet won't ""come"" on command, teach him the meaning of the word ""goodbye"" by driving away in your car--without him. There are useful suggestions, too, for dogs that chew, chase cars, bark, eat plants, or jump on furniture uninvited. Indeed, the advice on innumerable potential mishaps, while helpful, also makes training seem like an endless chore. But this is for dog-owners of some determination in any case.

Pub Date: June 30th, 1980
Publisher: Prentice-Hall