THEY CALL IT INTELLIGENCE by Joachim Joesten

THEY CALL IT INTELLIGENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A German-born writer who has become well known in this country as an editor and writer takes us into the strange, Alice-in-Wonderland labyrinths of international espionage and intelligence since World War II. In this trip to ""spyland"" we catch more than fleeting glimpses of America's C.I.A., England's M I 5, Russia's K.G.B., France's Deuxieme Bureau, and the spy apparatus of both East and West Germany at work. How spies operate, what they do, how the cloak-and-dagger aspect of their work is often overrated, yet in what fantastic and often blunder-filled situations they find themselves, takes the reader into the particulars of this supposedly ""invisible"" trade. The Col. Rudolph Abel-Gary Powers spy exchange is one of the most interesting examples given in the book. How Abel came to this country and lived as a Russian spy, how Gary Powers became a U-2 pilot, and how both men were captured, tried, and then exchanged gives valuable insight into the area of espionage. German General Gehlen's great intelligence operation for Hitler in the second World War, and how he and his apparatus survived to serve both the U.S. and West Germany, makes an equally interesting section. Dr. Otto John, Borris Morros, Burgess and Maclean---these and many others are touched on as the author highlights the great espionage coups of the past 17 turbulent years of ""peace"". A very informative, very readable book by a seasoned journalist.

Pub Date: Feb. 21st, 1962
Publisher: Abelard-Schuman