THE DILEMMA OF THE MODERN JEW by Joachim Prinz

THE DILEMMA OF THE MODERN JEW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A small book- but it packs a punch -- as a Rabbi in a large eastern congregation and a leading Zionist takes issue with many of the tenets of Zionism. He was a young rabbi in the early days of Hitler; he came to this country and achieved eminence in an incredibly short time. Here he presents the problem of the modern Jew, not only in America but in England, in France and so on- in relation to his adopted country and to Israel. He differs sharply with Ben-Gurion's position, calling all Zionists back to Israel. He traces the history of the modern Jew from September 28th (publication date), 1791- when Jews of France became bonafide citizens of the Republic of France, to today- through the years of the Emancipation. He does not ignore the setbacks- the pogroms, the genocide (of which the Hitler era was the peak), the intolerances- but he shows how Jews have become integral to the various countries- and feels that to these countries Jews today owe first loyalty. This is no violent emotional presentation, but a quiet and scholarly approach. To American Jews in particular it will clarify what is a generally held position without weakening the outpouring of support of the gallant little state of Isreal. He shows the part that Jews have played in our social and political atmosphere. And it can be particularly helpful to those Jews who are striving to learn something of their background of which they can be proud and yet solve the dilemma of today.

Publisher: Little, Brown