ALL THAT SEEMED FINAL by Joan Colebrook
Kirkus Star

ALL THAT SEEMED FINAL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This should have the same sort of market as Shelter -- a woman's book, tight keyed, effective, a little inconclusive -- and very readable. England tensing her nerves for war, in 1939, reflected through moments in the lives of an odd dozen, in a novel which flickers from the general to the intimate, from intellectual and socialite to servant. There is primarily Flavia, whose book it chiefly is, elfin, elusive, independent and married to a sulky weakling, Derek. She has a brief affair with Christopher, a painter -- then meets Richard, a writer, who has always prided himself on his insulation against emotional entanglements until he meets Flavia. Other characters shadow-play through the story of these four, while the war comes daily closer. Not a big book, but good for better than average rentals -- and a newcomer to watch.

Pub Date: Oct. 21st, 1941
Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin