THE VICTORIANS by Joan Evans

THE VICTORIANS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Intended to serve ""as a pendant"" to Allardyce Nicoll's The Elizabethans (p. 920, 1956), The Victorians proceeds in much the same manner to epitomize an epoch. Joan Evans' introductions are succeeded by a series of brief comments on Queen Victoria and her Age (""Nobody who has paid any attention to the peculiar feature of our present era, will doubt for a moment that we are living at a period of most wonderful transition which tends rapidly to accomplish that Great End to which, indeed, all history points--the realisation of the unity of mankind""); Society (""Always seek the society of those above yourself""); Women (""Their sex should ever teach them to be surbordinate""); People (""Mrs. Browning...is very small""); The Home (""No home of any pretensions will be devoid of a general bath room""), Transport and Trade (419,560 factory operatives of the British Empire in 1839, 192,887, or nearly half, were under eighteen years of age, 246,296 were of the female sex); Belief (for which Victorians had ""a notable capacity"").

Pub Date: July 22nd, 1966
Publisher: Cambridge Univ. Press