YIELD TO THE NIGHT by Joan Henry

YIELD TO THE NIGHT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Women In Prison (1952), which was a more subdued account of her own sentence, is followed by this possibly morbid monologue of the last thoughts during the last days of a murderer sentenced to hang. For Mary Hilton, who had killed the woman who had appropriated her lover and later impelled his suicide, there will be no reprieve- and these are the last rounds of the doctor, the chaplain, her lawyer and her former husband, and the matrons who treat her with solicitude. These too are the diminishing dark days and the lengthening white nights with their feverish dreams. Unrepentant, sometimes despondent, always afraid, she has little to hold her here in this world- nothing to hope for in the next, and the vertigo of scattered thoughts and incidental memories accelerates before the routine and final ritual of death.... In England, Edith Sitwell and Bertrand Russell have given this quite a send off but it's still pretty cheerless and a rather suspect type of flagellation.

Pub Date: Sept. 9th, 1954
Publisher: Doubleday