EVERYDAY LIFE IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE by Joan Liversidge

EVERYDAY LIFE IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Citing examples from throughout the Empire, though frequently falling back on Rome when provincial evidence is scant or lacking, Liversidge pieces together a topic-by-topic report on urban and, to a lesser extent, country life in the late first and second centuries A.D. (Roman Britain is not featured, because of the wide availability of other English language material.) Excavation sites, contemporary mosaics, reliefs, inscriptions, and other remains are cited (and pictured) as evidence bearing on town planning, plumbing systems, schooling, medical practice, trade, travel, commerce, dress, and other aspects of daily life. Regional differences in farm dwellings and organization and in ways of assimilating the Roman religion elicit separate treatment, but mostly the emphasis is on shared styles and customs among citizens, from Scotland to Africa to Syria, who could draw on a common legal system, language, currency, and curriculum. Liversidge, a Cambridge archaeologist, has a dryer style than we find in American YAs but the material is organized for easy access.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1976
Publisher: Putnam