DAME DURDEN'S DAUGHTER by Joan Smith

DAME DURDEN'S DAUGHTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Regency rustic--with a tried-and-true Barbara Cartlandish situation (here, however, played for humor as well as pit-a-pat). Will that hellish rake, Helver the young Duke of Saymore, really and truly reform enough to be worthy of that simple but pure-Tudor-blooded village maiden, his childhood playmate Edgitha (Edith for short)? Chances look slim, since randy Helver is smitten with the Baroness De Courcy (""a decided dasher""), and Edith's mother, Dame Durden, disapproves of both Helver's rowdiness and his Norman blood; she'd rather see Edith wed to Dorian Thorne, a C. of E. minister whose career happens to depend upon the young Duke's noblesse oblige. A nicely arranged triangle--but not quite enough to keep even the jocular Ms. Smith chortling for a whole book, though she does her best to flavor things up with the righteous vicar's foul tendencies: he tries to entrap the Duke's wealthy but marginally compos mentis teenage cousinette (""Would Annie like to have Doctor Thorne to keep?""), and he seems willing to give the Duke bedroom rights with his intended bride in exchange for some ducal handouts. Slow-moving and (for once) a bit under-populated, but there's always that welcome smirk behind the sighs.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1978
ISBN: 0000070149
Publisher: Walker