SIR GAWAIN AND THE LOATHLY DAMSEL by Joanna -- Retold by Troughton

SIR GAWAIN AND THE LOATHLY DAMSEL

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

What is it in all the world that women most desire?"" The answer -- knowledge of which saves King Arthur's life but binds Gawain in marriage to Lady Ragnall, the ""loathly damsel"" who reveals it to them -- is ""to rule over men."" But despite the treachery of her beautiful sister Lady Mordron who does desire just that, Gawain is such a ""true knight"" to his loathly bride that she thereby is freed from the evil spell which had obscured her own beauty. The couple's connubial harmony is oddly unrelated to the cynical riddle that goes before, and if the assumptions of chivalry are just as inconsistent, their exposure here is unintentional. Troughton's ""richly decorative"" pictures, with stained glass-like black outlines and sinuously flowing pools and robes and tresses, reveal a similarly shallow approach to the period.

Pub Date: Aug. 22nd, 1972
Publisher: Dutton