SHADOW FLIGHT by Joe Weber

SHADOW FLIGHT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Unrevised Russians snatch an American Stealth bomber and park it in Cuba. Techno-thrills and diplomatic chills from the author of Defcon One (1989). Political upheaval in the erstwhile evil empire continues to complicate the technothriller industry, rendering more than a few plots obsolete before they can make it into print. To cope with the dilemma, technowriters have come to rely heavily on the dissenting-faction-in-the-Soviet-power-structure gambit. This time the dissenting faction has decided that since the Soviets haven't the time or the money to catch up with techniques of radar invisibility, it is necessary to snatch a nice fresh American Stealth bomber, a task that is accomplished with depressing ease. All it takes is a brokenhearted and honey-trapped Stealth technician armed with a flare pistol and threatening speeches. The batwinged bomber disappears from a military exercise in Canada-and is not seen again until resourceful American agent, ex-Green Beret officer Steve Wickham, finds the plane hidden under a Cuban baseball field. The Soviet jetnappers have allied themselves with the last true Communists on earth. Before you can say Cuba Si! Yanqui No.!, the two nations are at war with each other. In the height of the action, the Stealth sneaks out and heads for Vladivostok. How do you find the durn thing when it's invisible? The technothrills are unexceptional, but the trip to Cuba is fun.

Pub Date: Sept. 15th, 1990
Publisher: Presidio