An entertaining, kinetic supernatural tale with surprises and a genial hero.

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RUN FOR YOUR LIFE, A LOVE STORY

A college student’s journey to see his romantic interest sends him on a terrifying, otherworldly detour in this dark fantasy.

This may be the last summer break for San Diegan Martin Brown, who plans to graduate from college next year and start his career. Having just lost his prospective summer job, he takes friends’ advice and sees a woman at a Los Angeles production company. This ultimately puts Martin in front of Chloë Setreal, who works at Alienopolis, a company specializing in fantasy books and games. Martin instantly falls for Chloë, and, it seems, the feeling is mutual. So he’s excited when Chloë later calls him for a job interview—mostly for the chance to see her again. Unfortunately, car trouble strands Martin in San Diego in the midst of a severe rainstorm. And that’s only the start of his mishaps. Seeking shelter or access to a phone (as his cell rarely has a signal), he finds himself entangled with everything from crazed murderers to vampires and maybe aliens as well. As authorities eye Martin for a serious crime and someone steals his ID, he desperately tries making it to Chloë, preferably alive. Argo excels at pacing, as his story begins leisurely and becomes increasingly frantic and unpredictable. By the novel’s latter half, some of these seemingly random events connect. This sparks a mere hint of something much larger unfolding, but the author wisely keeps it simple and doesn’t distract from Martin’s purpose. While the protagonist is certainly sympathetic, readers learn very little about Chloë other than her attractive physical details. As a consequence, signs of romance, even Martin’s daydreaming of their potential time together, aren’t convincing. Still, Martin traverses a hellish underworld so startling that reaching Chloë is a goal worth cheering for.

An entertaining, kinetic supernatural tale with surprises and a genial hero. (dedication, acknowledgement)

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: 978-0-7433-2048-1

Page Count: -

Publisher: Clocktower Books

Review Posted Online: June 5, 2020

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Hits the marks for spooky thrills and mysterious chills.

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BOOK OF NIGHT

A former thief who specialized in stealing magical documents is forced back into her old habits in Black's adult debut.

Charlie Hall used to work as a thief, stealing for and from magicians—or rather, “gloamists.” In this world, gloamists are people with magical shadows that are alive, gaining strength from the gloamists' own blood. A gloamist can learn to manipulate the magic of their shadow, doing everything from changing how it looks to using it to steal, possess a person, or even murder. Gloamists hire nonmagical people like Charlie to steal precious and rare magical documents written by their kind throughout history and detailing their research and experiments in shadow magic. Gloamists can use onyx to keep each other from sending shadows to steal these treasures, but onyx won't stop regular humans from old-fashioned breaking and entering. After Charlie’s talent for crime gets her into too much trouble, she swears off her old career and tries to settle down with her sensible boyfriend, Vince—but when she finds a dead man in an alley and notices that even his shadow has been ripped to pieces, she can’t help trying to figure out who he was and why he met such a gruesome end. Before she knows it, Charlie is forced back into a life of lies and danger, using her skills as a thief to find a book that could unleash the full and terrifying power of the shadow world. Black is a veteran fantasy writer, which shows in the opening pages as she neatly and easily guides the reader through the engrossing world of gloamists, magical shadows, and Charlie’s brand of criminality. There's a lot of flipping back and forth between the past and the present, and though both timelines are well plotted and suspenseful, the story leans a touch too hard on the flashbacks. Still, the mystery elements are well executed, as is Charlie’s characterization, and the big twist at the end packs a satisfying punch.

Hits the marks for spooky thrills and mysterious chills.

Pub Date: May 3, 2022

ISBN: 978-1-250-81219-3

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Tor

Review Posted Online: Feb. 5, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2022

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A deep and grimly whimsical exploration of what it means to be a son, a father, and an artist.

THE SWALLOWED MAN

A retelling of Pinocchio from Geppetto's point of view.

The novel purports to be the memoirs of Geppetto, a carpenter from the town of Collodi, written in the belly of a vast fish that has swallowed him. Fortunately for Geppetto, the fish has also engulfed a ship, and its supplies—fresh water, candles, hardtack, captain’s logbook, ink—are what keep the Swallowed Man going. (Collodi is, of course, the name of the author of the original Pinocchio.) A misfit whose loneliness is equaled only by his drive to make art, Geppetto scours his surroundings for supplies, crafting sculptures out of pieces of the ship’s wood, softened hardtack, mussel shells, and his own hair, half hoping and half fearing to create a companion once again that will come to life. He befriends a crab that lives all too briefly in his beard, then mourns when “she” dies. Alone in the dark, he broods over his past, reflecting on his strained relationship with his father and his harsh treatment of his own “son”—Pinocchio, the wooden puppet that somehow came to life. In true Carey fashion, the author illustrates the novel with his own images of his protagonist’s art: sketches of Pinocchio, of woodworking tools, of the women Geppetto loved; photos of driftwood, of tintypes, of a sculpted self-portrait with seaweed hair. For all its humor, the novel is dark and claustrophobic, and its true subject is the responsibilities of creators. Remembering the first time he heard of the sea monster that was to swallow him, Geppetto wonders if the monster is somehow connected to Pinocchio: “The unnatural child had so thrown the world off-balance that it must be righted at any cost, and perhaps the only thing with the power to right it was a gigantic sea monster, born—I began to suppose this—just after I cracked the world by making a wooden person.” Later, contemplating his self-portrait bust, Geppetto asks, “Monster of the deep. Am I, then, the monster? Do I nightmare myself?”

A deep and grimly whimsical exploration of what it means to be a son, a father, and an artist.

Pub Date: Jan. 26, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-593-18887-3

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Riverhead

Review Posted Online: Sept. 30, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2020

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